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Tibetan rug mandala design handwoven by Tibetan Artisans in Nepal

$497.00 $447.00

Tibetan rug dragon carpet handmade in Nepal

Size: 90 x 190cm (3 x 6 ft)
Design: Tibetan Mandala
Quality: 100 knots
Thickness: 3mm
Material: 100% Tibetan Organic Wool

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Description

Tibetan rug mandala design is handmade in Nepal by Tibetan and Nepalese artisans. These Tibetan carpets are made of 100% organic wool. And the quality is the highest quality with 100 knots/inch. It takes at least 2 months to make since they are hand-knotted by artisans. This typical carpet has mandala and shirivasta or love knot design which is one of the eight auspicious signs in Newari and Tibetan Buddhism.

Specification Tibetan rug mandala carpet:

Size: 90 x 190cm (3 x 6 ft)
Design: Jhan Druk
Quality: 100 knots
Thickness: 3mm
Material: 100% Tibetan Organic Wool

According to wikipedia: Tibetan rug making is an ancient, traditional craft. Tibetan rugs are traditionally made from Tibetan highland sheep‘s wool, called changpel. Tibetans use rugs for many purposes ranging from flooring to wall hanging to horse saddles, though the most common use is as a seating carpet. A typical sleeping carpet measuring around 3 ft × 5 ft (0.91 m × 1.52 m) is called a khaden.

The knotting method used in Tibetan rug making is different from that used in other rug making traditions worldwide. Some aspects of the rug making have been supplanted by cheaper machines in recent times, especially yarn spinning and trimming of the pile after weaving. However, some carpets are still made by hand. The Tibetan diaspora in India and Nepal have established a thriving business in rug making. In Nepal the rug business is one of the largest industries in the country and there are many rug exporters. Tibet also has weaving workshops, but the export side of the industry is relatively undeveloped compared with Nepal and India.

A mandala (emphasis on first syllable; Sanskrit मण्डल, maṇḍala – literally “circle”) is a spiritual and ritual symbol in Hinduism and Buddhism, representing the universe.[1] In common use, “mandala” has become a generic term for any diagram, chart or geometric pattern that represents the cosmos metaphysically or symbolically; a microcosm of the universe.

The basic form of most mandalas is a square with four gates containing a circle with a center point. Each gate is in the general shape of a T.[2][3] Mandalas often have radial balance.[4]

The term appears in the Rigveda as the name of the sections of the work, and Vedic rituals use mandalas such as the Navagraha mandala to this day. Mandalas are also used in Buddhism.

In various spiritual traditions, mandalas may be employed for focusing attention of practitioners and adepts, as a spiritual guidance tool, for establishing a sacred space and as an aid to meditation and trance induction.

 

You can also explore Tibetan art in the form of Tibetan thangka

Additional information

Weight5 kg
Dimensions190 x 90 cm

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